How to unleash the innovative potential of text and data mining (TDM) in the EU – via OpenForum Academy (OFA)

In Brussels on 22nd October 2015, Peter Murray-Rust was one of three invited speakers to talk at this important event.

SPEAKERS
Catherine Stihler | Member of the European Parliament, IMCO Vice-Chair and
substitute in ECON. Rapporteur of the IMCO Opinion for the EP’s own initiative
report on the implementation of the InfoSoc Directive
Peter Murray-Rust (PMR) | Founder of ContentMine and Shuttleworth Fellow, member of
the advisoryboard for the Open Knowledge Foundation
Jean-Francois Dechamp | Policy Officer at the European Commission, in DG Research
and Innovation
In part:-
PMR asserts that the TDM activities at Cambridge
should fall into the category, ‘fair use’. According to him, ‘the right to read is the right to
mine’ and no further obstacles should be imposed. When speaking about TDM,
PMR prefers to speak about ‘content’ mining. This is because although some
text will typically be included in any scientific paper, most of the rest of the paper
will consist of diagrams, mathematical equations, facts and tables. That is often the
most valuable part of the paper for a researcher, according to PMR,
and he therefore uses the term “content” as opposed to ‘text and data’, because he
perceives a risk that otherwise publishers could claim that because something is a
creative graphic work (rather than just text), it belongs to them.
Instead, PMR asserts that in the case of a factual representation, the mere presentation of
a fact in a diagram does not mean that the presentation of that fact becomes a
copyrighted piece of creative work; it still remains a simple fact, which belongs to
the public domain.
Full report available here (PDF) and follows PMR’s slides and video of this talk:-

The other speakers talks can be viewed here.

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Published by

steelgraham

Scotland's (main, but not only) #OpenScience #OpenAccess #OpenData #OpenSource #OpenKnowledge & #PatientAdvocate Loves blogging http://figshare.com/blog Glasgow, Scotland.

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